Alarming News

August 29, 2006

Read to me

Sunday night I, along with the good-looking Allah, had the pleasure of meeting the visiting Patterico and his lovely family. We had a great dinner, then grabbed some drinks and chatted politics, blogging and lots of other stuff I can’t remember now because I was on 4 hours sleep.

After I left the fellas, I went over to Weenie Enema’s for her legendary Emmy-watching party. As I don’t watch TV, much less awards show for TV, I was chalking it up to ‘it’ll be an experience’. And it was. Emma is quirky and sarcastic and generally cracks me up. I could spend like 2 days looking at all the cool stuff she has in her room. She’s got a great book collection too, and kept encouraging me to borrow something. I demured, because while totally wanting to borrow like 10 of her books, I have plenty of my own books that I have yet to read. And then I saw it. The book that I had read in the 6th grade and loved more than any other book. The one that had gotten me obsessed with reading. It was “The Outsiders” by S.E. Hinton. I read that book a million times, rented the movie with C. Thomas Howell, Ralph Macchio and every other famous young man of that era. I had to borrow. I had to. I started reading it that night and continued it on the way to work. It makes me feel just how I felt in 6th grade, completely immersed in the world of greasers and socs.

So, audience participation time: what was your favorite childhood book? My second favorite, when I was in 2nd grade or so, was “Lulu’s back in town” but “The Outsiders” was the one for me. What’s yours?

Posted by Karol at 09:28 AM |
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Comments

Anything involving Ramona. Or Encyclopedia Brown. Or Sweet Valley High.

Posted by: Not Dawn Summers at August 29, 2006 at 3:33 pm

I would humbly include all the Babysitters Club books up to #99 Stacey’s Broken Heart, all of the Hardy Boys up to #50 Danger on Vampire Trail, The Giver, weird random Cynthia Voight books, Hatchet, A Day No Pigs Would Die and I Am The Cheese. If there is room, the Encylopedia Brown books. I am not quirky.

Posted by: E. E. Grimshaw at August 29, 2006 at 3:53 pm

i didn’t know i could include links. i would have if i had known that. and dawn is amazing for including leroy “encylopedia” brown. she is trying to be me.

Posted by: E. E. Grimshaw at August 29, 2006 at 3:54 pm

I almost forgot all of the Judy Blume menstrual cycle books.

Posted by: E. E. Grimshaw at August 29, 2006 at 4:31 pm

Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse. I can’t remember how old I was, probably in 7th grade, but that was my first taste of existentialist fiction. It was all downhill from there.
Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold.

Posted by: Ed Z at August 29, 2006 at 4:33 pm

By the way, I had the rare privilege of meeting Allah last night. He is every bit as even-tempered, intelligent, and interesting as I

Posted by: sam at August 29, 2006 at 5:03 pm

Where the Sidewalk Ends, Shel Silverstein
Where the Wild Things Are by Sendak
Are the first 2 books that came to mind. Maybe even the “first” books.

Posted by: dan the Democrat at August 29, 2006 at 5:12 pm

Elements of Style, by Strunk & White, which teaches you, among other things, to like not use the word like when writing. :)
Just joking. My favorite book back then was “Being Michelle Malkin”
Okay. I lie. Sixth grade. I don’t know what the hell I was reading… if anything … in sixth grade … all sorts of stuff about Bigfoot and UFOs (that kept me up really late at night scared out of my mind), books about sharks, how-to-draw books, and a series of books by a guy named Jim Kjellgard, all of which featured a boy lost in the wilderness with his dog.

Posted by: Ken at August 29, 2006 at 5:31 pm

Sendak’s Wild Things is probably why I’m an illustrator today. Being a descendant, I had Dickens pushed on me by my great grandmother early on and have probably read A Christmas Carol annually since.

Posted by: Dino at August 29, 2006 at 5:34 pm

i LOVED where the wild things are!! it was the second book i bought when i was pregnant the first time!! and i loved anne of green gables and the little house series and judy blume books and pocahantas. i read Pocahantas a zillion times…oh and the misty, stormy horse books.

Posted by: sara at August 29, 2006 at 5:44 pm

I also read the outsiders and the rest of the books from that author – last year i had to but the ones i owned into recycle because they fell apart before i could pass them down to my kids.

Posted by: sara at August 29, 2006 at 5:48 pm

I didn’t realize the “poll” was 6th grade level.
I was a huge history buff around 6th grade and anything on WWII was on my list. I would sit in the library sometimes in the “war” section and just read books for hours. I got a present from my Dad the history of WWII (which began precisely where it should with WWI).
6th grade also was Tolkein time and anything King Arthur or Old English (Some prefer St. Ides lol).
“Those who forget history are destined to repeat it” – winston churchill.
By the way I get chills of childhood remembrance with “Where the wild things are”, also Bedtime for Frances…lol I wonder if that still gets printed. (Now I see my niece reading or at least owning) the very same books and I don’t think she can read yet but she lays back stares at the pages and flips like a real grown-up….truly amazing.

Posted by: dan the Democrat at August 29, 2006 at 5:56 pm

Are You There God, It’s Me, Margaret.

Posted by: Pattye at August 29, 2006 at 5:58 pm

By the 6th grade I discovered The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings … who would think that a story aimed at kids would teach about confronting evil before it was too late, and landed in your own back yard (and how relevant now). The only natural choice after that was the Conan books, and Edgar Rice Burroughs. Also, other classics like Robin Hood, King Arthur, stories by Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, James F. Cooper … and I was lucky enough to get them in editions illustrated by N.C. Wyeth.
I’d like to know what people are reading now, too.

Posted by: Dino at August 29, 2006 at 9:06 pm

By the 6th grade I discovered The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings … who would think that a story aimed at kids would teach about confronting evil before it was too late, and landed in your own back yard (and how relevant now). The only natural choice after that was the Conan books, and Edgar Rice Burroughs. Also, other classics like Robin Hood, King Arthur, stories by Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, James F. Cooper … and I was lucky enough to get them in editions illustrated by N.C. Wyeth.
I’d like to know what people are reading now, too.

Posted by: Dino at August 29, 2006 at 9:07 pm

“Sounds like he met his love match. Poor Mrs. Patterico!”
Hey, if I were gay, and if Allah were gay, I’d be all over that. Since we’re heterosexual, I’m just advising the ladies what they’re missing. Public service.

Posted by: Patterico at August 29, 2006 at 10:13 pm

“A Wrinkle in Time.”
I am so jealous you met Patterico. And got to watch the Emmies with Emma. And get to hang out with Allah.
But you can be jealous of me hanging out with Michael Totten on Sept 4th. Unless you want to join us. Would Allah emerge from his witness protection plan for that?

Posted by: Judith at August 30, 2006 at 2:37 am

Hey Dino we have a lot in common!
I guess your political view would depend on wich characters are wich in the Hobbit.
I imagine current reading is where we diverge, the last book I read was Hedghogging by Barton Biggs. I’m having trouble finding another but I am open to suggestions. There’s a new Dragonlance book by Weiss and Hickman but I’m not sure I can get into that now as I have developed a taste for non-fiction.
Since most people on this board seem to be “hawkish” 2 good books to read about what civilians ask of their soldiers.
The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer
(this crowd may not like this book because its about a 1/2 French soldier in the German Army during WWII)
Force Recon by Marjor Norton
(Vietnam, VERY relevant)
“Never, never, never believe any war will be smooth and easy, or that anyone who embarks on the strange voyage can measure the tides and hurricanes he will encounter. The statesman who yields to war fever must realize that once the signal is given, he is no longer the master of policy but the slave of unforeseeable and uncontrollable events. ” WC

Posted by: dan the Democrat at August 30, 2006 at 10:23 am

Dan, you might like Jeff Shaara’s historical novels about the Civil War and his last one, To the Last Man, about WWI. I’m currently rereading, FDR’s Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression, by Jim Powell. I should have saved it for Halloween, it’s scary reading how we almost became a socialist country.

Posted by: Dino at August 30, 2006 at 11:39 am

Any Nancy Drew. Closely followed by Old Yeller. The Outsiders was amazing too (ok I was a bookworm!) I really fancied Pony Boy in the book but not at all in the movie. C.Thomas Howell, eew!

Posted by: Steff at August 30, 2006 at 6:39 pm

Oh SIXTH grade. So over Nancy Drew by then – by then I was all about the Hollywood biographies, conspiracy/weird ufo/Loch Ness books and Judy Blume (the “Pre-teen section”, which was all of one shelf, hence the grown up books)

Posted by: Steff at August 30, 2006 at 6:43 pm

I loved Sendak, but (like my siblings) was taught to read very early in life and so read a lot of adult horror stories as a kid. I liked “The Hobbit” later on in my kid years.

Posted by: bryan at August 31, 2006 at 2:37 pm
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